The British Museum,
London
Petrie
Fitzwilliam
Ashmolean
The department of Ancient Egypt and Sudan holds objects from every stage of the long history of
the area, ranging from about 4500 BC to the later 14th century AD. The collection forms one of
the most comprehensive and magnificent collections in the world, surpassed only by the Egyptian
museum in Cairo.
The majority of the objects in the collection were purchased. The earliest and most important is
the first collection of the British Consul-General Henry Salt, purchased in 1823. The earlier
collection representing Egypt consisted of the objects acquired by the British nation following the
defeat of the French fleet at Abukir in 1802. A substantial part of the collection arises from
scientific excavation, which began in Egypt shortly after 1881. Many objects come from a variety
of donations.
The collections of the British Museum contain many objects from Deir el-Medina, comprising mainly
of inscribed objects.
The photographs are published with the kind permission of Dr. Richard Parkinson from the British
Museum's Department of Ancient Egypt and Sudan, and the British Museum's Photographic officer.
Go to the public galleries
Go to the depositories
and store rooms 2005
The page was last modified on March 7th 2010.
Turin
1. Bierbrier, Morris : The tomb-builders of the pharaohs
Cairo : The American University in Cairo Press, 1982.
Nicholson
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