Theban graffiti
Sources:
1. Weeks, Kent R.: The treasures of Luxor and the Valley of the Kings
Cercelli : White Star Publishers, 2005.
2. Pharaoh's workers : the villagers of Deir el-Medina / edited by Leonard H.
LeskoIthaca : Cornell University Press, 1994.
3. Wilkinson, R. H. : The complete gods and goddesses of Ancient Egypt.
London : Thames & Hudson, 2003.
4. Černý, Jaroslav: A community of workmen at Thebes in the Ramesside period
Cairo : Institut Francais d'archeologie Orientale du Caire, 1973.
5. www.egyptsites.co.uk/upper/luxorwest/other/meretseger.html
Vandalism in the form of modern
graffiti inside the shrine to Ptah
and Meretseger on the path
between the Valley of the Queens
and the settlement of Deir
el-Medina.
Settlement
Temples
Chapels
Tombs
Huts
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We also found this ancient graffiti
about 10 meters down the path
towards the Valley of the Queens.
Above the West wadi floor, on the path leading to the top of the cliffs, we found a cluster of
hieratic graffiti. There are nearly 4000 ancient graffiti texts now known among the mountains at
West Thebes (including some 5000 names). Graffiti in the picture were left here by the crew of
artisans from Deir el-Medina. They refer to their titles and their place  - "The place of thruth";
(m st m3't) as Deir el-Medina used to be called during New Kingdom.
Rock graffiti near the workmen's settlement on the col. There are a number of rock graffiti of
Dynasties XIX-XX written just west of the tomb-workers' temporary settlement on the col. Most of
these are spread along the lower reaches of a rock spur on the east face of el-Qurn for a distance of
about 150 m. For the most part these col graffiti preserve only the names and titles of several
well-known Deir el-Medina scribes and workmen, although there is also an important group of
inscriptions located here which also record the date of inundation of the Nile.
A sign or a mark that we found within the stone huts at the top of the cliffs:
The page was last modified on January the 4th 2018
These ancient marks marked a
stone on the way from the huts
back down the hill to the
settlement of Deir el-Medina.